Topic Name Description
Course Introduction Page Course Syllabus
Page Course Terms of Use
Unit 1: Introduction to Ribbons Page Unit 1 Learning Outcomes
1.1: Menu Environment Page Menu Environment

Study this example of a menu environment. Although we will be using a ribbon environment, the menu environment may be similar to what you are currently using. All word processors contain the same basic commands, although they may be found in different places.

1.2: Office Button/File Ribbon Page Office Button/File Ribbon

Compare the screenshots below. When Microsoft changed from a menu environment to a ribbon environment with the introduction of Word 2007, the File Menu became the Office Button.  This confused many people who were used to seeing the word "File," as in all previous version of Word. Therefore, in Word 2010 the Office Button was replaced by the File Ribbon.

1.2.1: Saving and Printing from the File Ribbon Page Save-Print

This video covers the ribbon environment in Microsoft 2010. After watching this lecture, you should be able to customize the Ribbon and use the Quick Access Toolbar to turn buttons on and off. You will also learn how to save documents, customize print options, and print using the File Ribbon.

1.2.2: Commands on the Ribbon Page Wikibooks: Microsoft Office: "Word Ribbon Reference (OS X)"

Review this reference sheet which lists and defines the commands on the ribbon. It will be useful to learn where each of the commands are so that you can quickly find them when creating documents.

1.3: Microsoft Word 2007 and 2010 Page 2007-2010 File Menus

This video will introduce you to the structure of the ribbon in the most recent versions of Microsoft Word. The instructor demonstrates the ribbon with both the Office button and File ribbon, so it should look familiar to you as long as you are using a version of Microsoft Word released in 2007 or after. Pay attention to different tools that can be accessed with the ribbon such as templates, such as opening existing and creating new documents as well as selecting templates.

Unit 2: Creating a Block Style Business Letter Page Unit 2 Learning Outcomes
2.1: The Business Letter Page Parts of a Business Letter

Read this overview of the basic parts of a business letter.

2.1.1: Business Letters without Letterhead File Example of a Business Letter without Letterhead

Read this sample business letter without letterhead. If letterhead is not available, the return address is given on the top of the letter. This is done so that if the accompanying envelope is discarded, the recipient still has the address of the company or person who sent the letter.

You may also access this material as a Microsoft Word document here.

2.1.2: Business Letters with Letterhead File Example of a Business Letter with Letterhead

Now that you have seen a business letter without letterhead, read this sample business letter with letterhead. Notice that you do not need to include the return address since it is included on the letterhead. Businesses will usually use letterhead stationery to print all documents to be mailed out.

You may also access this material as a Microsoft Word document here.

2.2: How to Create a Block Style Business Letter Page Creating a Block Style Business Letter

Watch this lecture, remembering to pause to compare what is on-screen to your own word processing program.

Page Wikibooks: Professional and Technical Writing: "Business Communications: Letters"

Read this material for a more in-depth explanation of the business letter and to learn about the differences between business letters and other types of letters.

2.3: Create Your Own Block Style Business Letter File Practice Business Letter

Download this Microsoft Word document. Use the checklist below to help you create a block style business letter. Most, but not all, of the text has already been typed, but formatting needs to be addressed. Save and print the document when you are finished and compare it to the answer key below. Try not to look at the answer key until after you have attempted this activity on your own first.

Please review the following checklist when creating your business letter:

  1. Was there letterhead? If not, is the return address properly formatted at the top?
  2. Is the date included?
  3. Is the inside address properly formatted?
  4. Is there a greeting line?
  5. Is the body of the letter left-aligned with a blank space between paragraphs?
  6. Is there enough space for a signature?
  7. Are the typist's initials present?
  8. Are there enclosures that need to be noted and the work enclosure included?
  9. Is a copy of this going to another person so a CC needs to be included?

File Practice Business Letter Answer Key

You have just finished reformatting a draft letter to create a block style business letter. Review this answer key and compare it to your letter. If you changed or added any text, yours may look a little different, but the formatting should be the same.

You may also access this material as a Microsoft Word document here.

2.4.1: The Modified Block Style Business Letter Page Digital Communications: Tangient LLC's "Modified Block Style Letter"

Now that you have learned how to successfully create a block style business letter, look at this sample of a modified business letter. Pay attention to the differences between this and a block style letter. In a modified business letter, the date is centered at the top of the page and each paragraph is indented. What other differences do you notice?

2.4.2: The Semi-Block, or Indented, Business Letter Page TW Zaid: Tangient LLC's "Business Letter Styles"

Review this example of a semi-block business letter, also known as an indented business letter. In a semi-block business letter, each paragraph is indented five spaces, and the rest of the paragraph is aligned on the left. In addition, there is a space between each paragraph.

Unit 3: Creating a Block Style Business Memo Page Unit 3 Learning Outcomes
3.1: The Block Style Business Memo File Example of a Business Memo

Examine this example of a block style memo which also defines the parts of a memo. Again, the non-printing characters are shown in the example to help explain the formatting in the document. These characters will not actually print out on your finished documents.

You may also access this material as a Microsoft Word document here.

Page Wikibooks: Professional and Technical Writing: "Business Communications: Memos"

Read this material to learn about how memos are used and guidelines for creating a memo. As you read, think about a memo that you have sent or received. Did it follow these guidelines?

3.2: How to Create a Block Style Business Memo Page Creating a Block Style Business Memo

This lecture shows how to format a business memo. After watching this video, you will know how to create and align memo headings, format fonts, and add borders to separate the heading from the body of the memo. You will also learn when and how to bold, italicize, and underline fonts. In the next subunit, you will get a chance to create your own!

3.3: Create Your Own Block Style Business Memo File Practice Business Memo

Download this Microsoft Word document. Use the checklist below to help you create a block style business memo. Most of the memo has been typed for you, but the formatting needs to be corrected. Save and print the document when you are finished and compare it to the answer key provided below. Try not to look at the answer key until after you have attempted this activity on your own first.

Please review the following checklist when creating a business memo:

  1. Is the word MEMO centered on the top with a space underneath?
  2. Are the heading words to, from, date, and subject capitalized and bolded, but not the information following the heading words?
  3. Was the Tab key used to line up all information after the heading words?
  4. Is the spacing correct?
  5. Is there a line separating the top heading information from the body of the text?
  6. Are the typist's initials present?

File Practice Business Memo Answer Key

You have just finished reformatting a draft memo to create a block style business memo. Review this answer key and compare it to your memo. Yours should look nearly identical to what is presented here.

You may also access this material as a Microsoft Word document here.

3.4: Going Beyond the Basics: Page Numbers, Headers, and Footers Page University of Michigan Library Research Guides: "Microsoft Word 2010 and 2013 for Dissertations"

Now that you have learned how to use Microsoft Word for basic word processing, you are ready to learn some more advanced word processing skills! Read this lesson to learn how to add page numbers, and create headers and footers. Once you are finished, practice what you have learned by creating your own business letter or memo from scratch. Can you add a header and page numbers?

Optional Course Evaluation Survey URL Optional Course Evaluation Survey

Please take a few moments to provide some feedback about this course. Consider completing the survey whether you have completed the course, you are nearly at that point, or you have just come to study one unit or a few units of this course.

Your feedback will focus our efforts to continually improve our course design, content, technology, and general ease-of-use. Additionally, your input will be considered alongside our consulting professors' evaluation of the course during its next round of peer review. As always, please report urgent course experience concerns to [email protected] and/or our discussion forums.