Topic Name Description
Course Introduction Page Course Syllabus
Page Course Terms of Use
1.1: Why Is It Important to Communicate Well? URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 1, Section 1: Why Is It Important to Communicate Well?"

Read the introduction to Chapter 1 and Section 1. These sections emphasize how communication forms a part of your self-concept, helping you to understand yourself and others, solve problems, learn new things, and build your career. Attempt the exercises at the end of Section 1.

Page "What is Communication and Why Does It Matter?"

As you watch this video, think about the basics of communication and how they impact you not only in business, but also in many other aspects of your life.

1.2: What Is Communication? URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 1, Section 2: What Is Communication?"

Read this section, which describes the communication process, including its eight essential elements: source, message, channel, receiver, feedback, environment, context, and interference. This section also reviews communication models based on transactions and shared meaning. After you read, attempt exercises at the end of the section.

Page University of Amsterdam: "What is Communication?"

This video describes the categories of communication as parts of a pyramid-shaped structure of communication science. Why is it important to appreciate communication science? This video shows that "institutional communication," which is another way of describing business communication, is near the top of the pyramid. Why is institutional communication at a higher level than group communication, but lower than societal communication?

Page Ann-Louise Davidson and Nadia Naffi's "Shannon and Weaver Model"

The Shannon and Weaver model of communication is probably the best known of all communication models. This video demonstrates the two reasons behind its popularity: (1) it identifies the most important components of any communication process, and (2) it diagrams how those components interact. What does this mean for you and how you can become a more effective communicator? You can answer this question and appreciate Shannon and Weaver's model by considering any instance of communication between yourself and any other being capable of communication (including non-humans). Use the model to identify all of the elements you, as a communicator, need to respond to to communicate effectively in that instance. For example, think about how you would tell a dog or cat that you approved of its behavior. Think specifically about how you would have to adjust each of the components in Shannon and Weaver's model to insure that the dog or cat understood you. Next, think about how you would respond differently to those components if you needed to communicate the same kind of approval to a human being, perhaps a co-worker or trainee. Finally, consider a scenario in which you had to communicate disapproval to an already hostile individual. Which elements in the model would you have to modify? These questions illustrate how Shannon and Weaver's model increases your awareness of communication situations and enables you to "first seek to understand, then seek to be understood."

Page "How does Communication Work?"

This video reinforces the importance of understanding communication, covering the subject in greater depth than previous videos. Both the lecturer's comments and the slideshow are dense with information, so be sure to take notes. Pay attention to the slide that diagrams a model of communication that is slightly different from the Shannon and Weaver model. Many models exists to explain the communication process, although most are very similar, and nearly all of them include at least some of the components in Shannon and Weaver's model.

1.3: Communication in Context URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 1, Section 3: Communication in Context"

Read this section, which introduces intrapersonal, interpersonal, group, public, and mass communication. It also discusses their advantages and disadvantages, and appropriate and inappropriate ways to use each one. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page "Levels of Communication"

Watch this brief video to reinforce the different kinds of communication you explored earlier. The video provides several examples for each level.

1.4: Your Responsibilities as a Communicator URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 1, Section 4: Your Responsibilities as a Communicator"

Read this section, which addresses you as a communicator, and emphasizes how good communicators should be ethical and well-prepared. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page Pat McDonald's "It's Your Job to Make Others Understand"

As you watch this video, keep in mind Pat McDonald's advice: "Seek first to understand, then seek to be understood." It is a communicator's responsibility to make others understand the communication. In this video, he recommends a simple three-step process. After you watch, think about a time when someone misunderstood your message, and then try analyzing the situation by describing the purpose, details, and action as covered in the video. Did McDonald's process helped you identify where you erred or were weak in your responsibilities as a communicator?

Page "The NLP Communication Model"

Watch this video, which will help you recognize the factors that influence your communication effectiveness and reactions to communication stimuli. The neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) model introduced in the video focuses on physical elements of communication to explain how the mind filters the information we receive externally and internally. Awareness of these factors can help a communicator overcome his or her negative impacts. After you watch, write a paragraph that summarizes the NLP Communication Model.

Page "Nonverbal-Verbal Channels"

Watch this brief video about body language and what it says about you. How can you apply these concepts in your professional and personal life?

Page Monique Cloutier's "Words, Tone, and Body Language: Matching and Mirroring to Build Rapport"

This video illustrates how to match your body language, tone of voice, and word choices to create rapport.

2.1: What Is Language? URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 2 Introduction and Section 1: What is Language?"

Read the introduction to "Chapter 2: Delivering Your Message" and "Section 1: What Is Language?". These sections discuss the role of words in delivering your message, and how language is a system of words. Idea-conveying symbols are ruled by syntax, semantics, and context - all of which require interpretation. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page John Whorter's "What is Language?"

Watch this video, which lays the foundation for understanding and appreciating language. The lecturer chooses an interesting technique to clarify what language is and what it isn't by contrasting human language and animal "language." After you watch, see if you can summarize what makes human language distinct.

Page Jessica Bolack Frank's "Plain Language"

Plain language is the most effective way to communicate. Think of this as an interactive video; respond to the questions the speaker asks and compare your responses to hers. Take part in the verbal exercises that begin around 9:00. You may not have access to some of the software referred to in this video, but don't let that stand in your way.

2.2: Messages URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 2, Section 2: Messages"

Read this section, which discusses categorizing messages based on their importance. It also introduces the five common elements in any message, some of which you will recognize from the discussion in Chapter 1 about communication models and all of which you will encounter later when you examine how a speech is organized. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page Dianna Booher's "Are You Reasoning Right?"

Messages are at the heart of communication. Knowing what your message is, refining it to be clear, and tailoring it for specific audiences are all key skills. These videos present the author's advice in the manner she suggests most messages need to be presented: clearly and concisely. This video focuses on reasoning, which is directly connected to messages, since your reasoning becomes the content of your messages. "Faulty reasoning" results in weak or erroneous messages.

Page Courtland Bovee and John Thill's "A New Organizing Model for Business Messages"

This video introduces storytelling, which is the latest popular technique for developing business messages.

After you watch this video, consider this scenario. Your business sells sleeper sofas that can open up to become a bed for one person. Add details to the product if you need to, but focus on creating a story that would get people interested in trying or buying the sofa. Refer to the storytelling examples in the video and follow their structure in your own story. This may be an opportunity for you to use the discussion forum to interact with other students who are taking this course. See if your story is effective by trying it out on your colleagues.

2.3: Principles of Verbal Communication URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 2, Section 3: Principles of Verbal Communication"

Read this section, which goes deeper into the rules that govern language and then introduces the concept of language paradigms. These are premises that are taken as fact. This section explains how language is arbitrary, symbolic, and abstract, and how it imperfectly serves to organize and classify reality. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page "The Power of Verbal Communication"

In this video, communication scholars discuss the nature of verbal communication. We often think of verbal and non-verbal communication together, because most of our face-to-face communication uses both. However, verbal communication is the dominant factor online, and as a result needs to be carefully crafted to consider the nature of virtual environments. This video introduces many important points about the nature of verbal communication when it is isolated from the nonverbal elements that usually accompany it in the "real" world. Keep in mind that some scholars would define the visual characteristics of messages as nonverbal traits, even when their content is presented solely with words. So, although that distinction is not made in this video, remember that the "look" of verbal message, such as the typeface, size, use of color, length of paragraphs, graphics, and so on, must also be considered in virtual environments.

2.4: Language Can Be an Obstacle to Communication URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 2, Section 4: Language Can Be an Obstacle to Communication"

Read this section, which discusses why clichés, jargon, slang, sexism, racism, euphemisms, and doublespeak weaken the effectiveness of language by making it less efficient and/or less acceptable. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page "Language as an Obstacle to Communication"

This video discusses how imprecise or unclear language can lead to a communication gap, and the effects that a gap may have on your work. Pay attention to how various examples of poor language habits, such as cliché, jargon, slang, racist or sexist language, euphemism, and doublespeak are defined and differentiated.

2.5: Emphasis Strategies URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 2, Section 5: Emphasis Strategies"

Read this section, which describes communication tactics that can be used to emphasize a message or parts of a message: visuals, signposts, reviews, previews, and repetition. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page Diana Booher's "Four Ways to Cut the Clutter From Your Business Writing"

This Dianna Booher video and the one that follows focus on eliminating details that are unnecessary in delivering a message so that the key points in the message are not only clearer but also more emphatic. Watch this video and then cement Booher's point in your mind by revising this paragraph so that unnecessary words are eliminated and as a result, its message has more impact. Work on this sequence first: "eliminating details that are unnecessary in delivering a message."

Hint: Using just three words would emphasize the point. Look for and improve similar "clutter" in the rest of the paragraph, too. This also may be a good opportunity for you to use the discussion forums to interact with other students who are taking this course. See if your response is correct and effective by trying it out on your colleagues.

Page National Digital Learning Arena: "Descriptive Language"

"Descriptive language adds atmosphere, intensity and drama to a situation."

Watch this video to learn how to improve your messages by choosing words for impact. As you watch, don't forget Dianna Booher's advice. Descriptive language does not mean more words, which can just clutter up your message. It means well-chosen words that will add emphasis to your message.

Page "Tutorial on Style in Professional Writing: Active and Passive Voice"

A communicator's "voice" can shift the emphasis of a statement. After watching this video, you should be able to explain what that means. Practice by writing a sentence that uses passive voice, and then shift its emphasis by revising it to use active voice.

This may also be a good opportunity for you to use the discussion forums to interact with other students who are taking this course. See if your response is correct and effective by comparing it to those of your colleagues.

2.6: Improving Verbal Communication URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 2, Section 6: Improving Verbal Communication"

Read this section, which describes how to improve communication by defining your terms, choosing precise words, considering your audience, controlling your tone, checking for understanding, and adopting results-oriented approaches. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page Saint Cloud State University: "Choosing Good Words"

Watch this video, which focuses on word choice and vocabulary. It provides an in-depth look at not only the meaning of your word choices, but also the sounds of those words and how those sounds have an impact on the words' effectiveness. You should recognize that this video continues the themes from the previous subunit, which also focused on word choice. However, be aware that the objective of this lecture is improving the clarity of your language, not necessarily adding emphasis.

Page Diana Booher's "Four Tips to Make Your Message Memorable"

This video ties together the concepts presented in this subunit and applies them to real-world messaging. To practice, choose a realistic business message and apply Booher's tips when considering how you would present it. For example, perhaps your business needs to communicate that it is opening a new store, or perhaps you need to remind employees of certain safety measures they must to follow. If you try this exercise, post your thoughts in the discussion forums to give your colleagues something to consider and compare with their own.

3.1: Self-Understanding Is Fundamental to Communication URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 3, Section 1: Self-Understanding Is Fundamental to Communication"

Read the introduction to Chapter 3 and Section 1. These focus on how you can become a more effective communicator by understanding yourself and how others view you. They also discuss the centrality of attitudes, beliefs, and values with for one's self-concept, and how self-fulfilling prophecies can influence decision making. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page Wikipedia: "The Pygmalion Effect"

The Pygmalion effect is an example of self-fulfilling prophecy, which can have severe effects on how you communicate and present yourself to others. Pay attention to the impact of the Pygmalion effect in the workplace.

3.2: Perception URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 3, Section 2: Perception"

Read this section, which explains how we select, organize, and interpret words and ideas based on a perceptual framework that is shaped by our expectations and assumptions. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page University of Amsterdam: "Selective Processing"

This video illustrates perception, which is how people process stimuli from the world around them. After you watch, see if you can summarize the video's key point into a single sentence. Provide an example of how you might address this point in a business communication. This exercise may present a good opportunity for you to use the discussion forums to interact with other students who are taking this course. See if your response is effective by trying it out on your colleagues.

Page University of Amsterdam: "Cognitive Shortcuts"

This video explains that "we process information subjectively." Was the statement you produced for the previous video as accurate as this statement? After watching this video, see if you can explain its importance to someone else. This may be a good opportunity for you to use the discussion forums to interact with other students who are taking this course. See if your response is correct and effective by trying it out on your colleagues.

3.3: Differences in Perception URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 3, Section 3: Differences in Perception"

Read this section, which focuses on how individual differences and preconceived notions can limit how well we work with others. Understanding one another can improve our communication across languages, cultures, and perspectives. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page University of Amsterdam: "Central and Peripheral Route"

With these videos, find the key point, summarize it in a single statement, and then apply it to a business communication scenario. Compare your responses to those of your colleagues in the discussion forums.

3.4: Getting to Know Your Audience URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 3, Section 4: Getting to Know Your Audience"

Read this section, which presents perceptual strategies you can use to understand audiences better and customize messages to be effective with specific audiences. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page University of Amsterdam: "Active Audiences"

Find the key point, summarize it in a single statement, and then apply it to a business communication situation. Compare your response to those of your colleagues in the discussion forums.

Page Morry Morgan's "Know Your Audience, or Kill Them"

This video includes a fascinating story that makes the speaker's point for him. Can you come up with a story that illustrates the same point? This is another chance to practice the storytelling techniques from the previous videos.

This may also be a good opportunity for you to use the discussion forums to interact with other students who are taking this course. See if your response is effective by comparing it to those of your colleagues.

3.5: Listening and Reading for Understanding URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 3, Section 5: Listening and Reading for Understanding"

Read this section, which explains active listening and active reading and why they are important behaviors associated with effective communication. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

URL Stand Up, Speak Out: "Chapter 4 Introduction and Section 1: Listening vs. Hearing"

These sections explain the difference between listening and hearing, and the benefits of listening in effective communication. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page Keele University: "Active Listening Strategies"

Most of the videos have been developed to assist traditional students in face-to-face classes; however, the information they contain is also relevant in the business world. They introduce and discuss active listening, and explain why it is more effective than passive listening. They also cover efficient reading skills. How do you listen and read to learn most effectively?

4.1: Oral vs. Written Communication URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 4, Section 1: Oral versus Written Communication"

These sections start with a review of the elements discussed in the communication models introduced in Unit 1, defining them and illustrating how writing differs from speaking. The biggest difference between those writing styles is that writing is usually asynchronous. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page "Oral vs. Written Communication"

By the end of this video, you will be able to explain the eight essential elements of communication and explain how oral and written communication differ.

4.2: How Is Writing Learned? URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 4, Section 2: How Is Writing Learned?"

Read this section, which demonstrates how you get better at reading and writing as you do it more often. This section discusses the benefits of constructive criticism, critical thinking, and targeted practice. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

4.3: Principles of Good Written Communication and Writing Style URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 4, Section 3: Good Writing"

Read this section, which covers the characteristics of good writing, including examples of how rhetorical elements and cognate strategies relate to business communication practices. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 4, Section 4: Style in Written Communication"

Read this section, which categorizes writing styles as colloquial, casual, informal, or formal, and indicates when and where each style is appropriate. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 4, Section 5: Principles of Written Communication"

Read this section, which many of the same concepts that were applied to language in Chapter 2 to words themselves. Words are governed by rules, shape reality, and have ethical dimensions. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page Dianna Booher's "Good Business Writing Habits"

"Your writing reflects the essence of your personal presence". What does this mean, and why is it important if you are not there when someone reads what you have written? Booher provides the answer to this question in these videos.

4.4: Overcoming Barriers to Effective Written Communication URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 4, Section 6: Overcoming Barriers to Effective Written Communication"

This section argues that to overcome barriers to communication, good writers pay attention to details, strive to understand the target meaning, consider nonverbal expressions, and make it a habit to review, reflect, and revise. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page Dianna Booher's "Communication Mistakes by Salespeople"

These videos point out how mistakes can be barriers to effective communication. They then discuss how they apply to written and spoken contexts.

4.5: Business Writing in Action URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 9: Business Writing in Action"

These sections emphasize how your written business communication represents you and your company. It should be clear, concise, and professional. These sections also discuss the importance of netiquette in the workplace; common examples include memos, business letters, business proposals, reports, resumes, and sales messages. After you read, try the exercises at the end of each section.

URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 6, Section 2: Writing Styles"

This section focuses on various writing styles including formal and informal styles, the impact of being conversational in your writing, how to add emphasis, using a passive or active voice, and more. As you read this section, consider the ways in which you can improve your own writing style and be more effective in all of your messaging. After reading, try the exercises at the end of the section. 

Page Hong Kong Polytechnic University: Peter Birch, Jim Lo, Phil Todd's "Email Etiquette"

Because writing an email is something people do every day, people have a tendency to be casual about the process. Watch this video on why business emails need to be carefully considered to create the right impression and communicate effectively. Consider the impression that a sender's actual email address can make, or how its subject line, greeting, content, word choices, and writing style can affect the overall message. The context of this video is student writing, but each of these areas must be considered in business, too. After you watch, examine your "sent" email folder and find emails you've sent to people who were not friends or family. Critique your own email etiquette and identify ways you could improve your technique.

Page Dianna Booher's "Writing a Winning Sales Proposal Is Like Building a Grand House"

Watch this video on how to write an effective sales proposal. Most people approach a proposal by finding someone else's proposal and using it as a template that enables them to "fill in the blanks". By now, you should be aware of the need to tailor your messages so that they suit your particular audience. Given the importance of persuading an audience to accept and adopt your recommendations, cutting corners by copying someone else's presentation is not a good plan. That this video uses a term very familiar to people who work in marketing: "unique value proposition." This is the key message in a sales proposal. It indicates how the product benefits the consumer, meets his or her needs, and is better than its competition. As the term implies, the value proposition is unique, which is another reason why copying others' proposals to produce your own is not a good idea.

Page Jim Ackerman's "The Inverted Pyramid"

Watch this video, which focuses on copywriting, and introduces a writing structure known as the inverted pyramid, which focuses on addressing the "who," "what," "where," "when," "why", and "how" elements in a message. To become more familiar with this structure, read the first two paragraphs of a few news stories. By the second paragraph of most stories, the reporter will have identified most of the "5Ws" and maybe the "H". Don't lose track of this speaker's point: the inverted pyramid is an effective way to write sales messages, too, especially if you can't come up with a more creative way. Once you've examined some examples of news stories that use the inverted pyramid, choose a product at random and describe its unique value proposition. As an exercise, describe the "5Ws" and "H" that would frame a sales letter about that product. Consider posting your solution the discussion forums to get feedback from your colleagues.

Page "Business Writing"

These videos cover a variety of topics that you might encounter when writing in a business environment. They discuss proper netiquette, which is an essential skill in today's workplace. Understanding the role of text messaging in business and writing effective internal and external emails are critical skills for business professionals. They also explain the purpose and format of business letters, memos, proposals, reports, and resumes, as well as strategies for writing each.

5.1: Planning for the Presentation URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 10, Section 1: Before You Choose a Topic"

Speech planning begins with knowing your general and specific purpose, your time allotment, your audience, and the amount of information you have available. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 10, Section 2: Choosing a Topic"

Choosing a speech topic involves knowing yourself and your audience; using efficient strategies; and understanding appeal, appropriateness, and ability. These are also steps that will lead to developing an effective thesis statement. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 12: Organization and Outlines"

This section addresses the elements of the rhetorical situation and the ways that a presentation should be organized. Elements of focus are the "who," "what," "where," "when," "why," and "how" of your speech. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 12, Section 5: Organizing Principles for Your Speech"

Read this section, which lists 17 purpose-specific organizing patterns for business communication speeches and gives step-by-step guidance for other styles, such as ceremonial, wedding, award, introduction, and other nonacademic functions. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page Keele University: Matt Coombe-Boxall's "Presentations Skills, Principles, and Practicals"

Watch this video for some basic strategies for delivering your speech, including the use of technology, meeting the needs of your audience, ensuring that the equipment is working properly, and more. Keep these tips in mind when delivering your future speeches.

5.2: Strategies for Maintaining Objectivity URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 13, Section 1: Functions of the Presentation to Inform"

These sections review the ways you can maintain objectivity and provide unbiased information to your audience. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

URL Boundless: "Variations in Language"

Read this section, which gives tips for keeping your speech on target, interesting, and without bias.

5.3: Focusing on Your Audience URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 13, Section 2: Types of Presentations to Inform"

Read this section, which covers how an informative speech may explain, report, describe, or demonstrate how to do something in a way that engages your audience. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 13, Section 3: Adapting Your Presentation to Teach"

Successful speeches encourage active listening and use audience-centered approaches. This section describes several ways to motivate an audience by making material relevant and useful and by finding interesting ways to frame topics. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

5.4: Informing through Effective and Ethical Speeches URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 13, Section 5:  Preparing Your Speech to Inform"

Read this section, which describes how to give an ethical speech, especially when the purpose of that speech is to inform. It is important to be non-judgemental and honest in your approach. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 13, Section 6: Creating an Informative Presentation"

This section discusses the content and function of the five parts of a presentation. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 12, Section 3: Building a Sample Speech"

Read this section, which covers how speeches are built by using the five structural elements: attention statement, introduction, body, conclusion, and residual message. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 14, Section 6: Speaking Ethically and Avoiding Fallacies"

Read this section, which lists 11 points to focus on to ensure that your speech is ethical. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

5.5: Motivating and Persuading in a Speech URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 14, Section 2: Principles of Persuasion"

Read this section about the six principles of communication and how to incorporate them into your speeches where appropriate. The exercises at the end of the section will provide you with the opportunity to practice your skills.

URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 14, Section 3: Functions of the Presentation to Persuade"

This section reviews what persuasive speeches are designed to do: stimulate thought, convince, call to action, increase consideration, or develop tolerance of alternate perspectives. This section also provides a useful breakdown of different types of calls to action. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

5.6: Language Obstacles and Cross-Cultural Communication URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 10, Section 5: Overcoming Obstacles in Your Presentation"

Read this section, which illustrates how language and culture can become obstacles in effective communication. Explore different cultural dimensions the impact of ethnocentrism. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page Brooke Wheeler, John Dean, and Madhu Yennawar's "Cross Cultural Communication"

Watch this video, which defines cross-cultural communication, breaks it down into different types and gives some examples of communication challenges that can occur in cross cultural communication. After watching this video, imagine that you are aware that the audience of your Rotary Club or Chamber of Commerce presentation will include the Japanese family who owns a shop next to the building where your new office is located. There will also be several members of the local women's entrepreneurial club who were also invited to your watch your presentation. Consider how will this knowledge impact your presentation and the stories you will share with your audience.

5.7: Argumentative Strategies and Emotional Appeals URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 14, Section 5: Making an Argument"

Read this section, which covers rhetorical and argumentative strategies for persuasion, how to appeal to emotions, and the circumstances under which you may choose to use these approaches. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page Critical Thinker Academy: "What Is a Strong Argument?"

Watch this video for more information about what makes an argument strong enough to be convincing. Afterwards, write a brief paragraph that summarizes what makes a strong argument.

5.8: Elevator Pitches and Sound Bites URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 14, Section 8: Elevator Speech"

Read this section, which provides a brief discussion about the role and creation of the brief sales pitch known as the elevator speech. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page Dianna Booher's "What Makes a Great Elevator Speech"

Watch these videos on how to refine your elevator speech techniques. After watching, craft a 60-second elevator speech that you would give to the president of your town's Rotary Club or Chamber of Commerce if you happened to find yourself sharing an elevator with him or her. If you can record your speech, consider posting the recording or a link to it on the discussion forums to get feedback from your colleagues.

URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 15: Business Presentations in Action"

These sections describe the traits of good sound bites and what makes them memorable. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page "Examples of Soundbites"

Review these soundbites from prominent people. Consider the words and the ways they are delivered. As you develop soundbites for your own business needs, keep in mind how the media uses these kinds of messages to connect with audiences so that you can craft messages that the media will share.

5.9: Setting Agendas for Productive Meetings URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 15, Section 3: Meetings"

Read this comprehensive list of the elements that characterize a formal business agenda, and the extensive list of strategies for ensuring that meetings are productive. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page Gareth Williams' "How to Set Out a Meeting Agenda"

Watch this example of how to produce a meeting agenda. This video describes one of many options for using agendas to help ensure that meetings are run efficiently and effectively.

6.1: Creating Effective Negative News Messages URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 17: Negative News and Crisis Communication"

These sections examine the impact of having to distribute negative news, and introduces seven important objectives that negative news messages should accomplish. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

URL "Examples of Bad News Messages"

Review these messages. What makes some of them effective, and what makes others ineffective? These samples demonstrate real-life situations where bad news needed to be delivered. See how you can apply the information you learned in the previous section here.

6.2: Obtaining Feedback URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 17, Section 2: Eliciting Negative News"

Read this section, which explains the necessity and value of feedback, how to encourage employees and members of the public to participate in providing feedback, and how to use open and closed-ended questions to elicit feedback. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

6.3: Crisis Communication URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 17, Section 3: Crisis Communication Plan"

Read this section, which covers how to prepare a crisis plan, including designating a crisis communication team and a spokesperson. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page "Crisis Communication Plan"

This video will help you prepare a crisis communication plan. For more information, review PRSM107: Crisis Communication. That course includes in a major project in which students create their own crisis communication plan. Check it out!

Page Keith Robertory's "Risk & Communication Crisis Basics"

Watch this video about the fundamentals of risk communication, produced by the disaster response emergency communications manager for the American Red Cross. He discusses how the public has the ability to respond through social media, no matter what type of media you are using to communicate. This kind of feedback connects crisis communication to negative news issues you encountered in the previous subunit. Remember that context of crisis communication introduces special requirements and limitations for a business communicator, which Robertory also discusses.

Page Keith Robertory's "Risk & Communication Crisis Basics"

Watch this video about the fundamentals of risk communication, produced by the disaster response emergency communications manager for the American Red Cross. He discusses how the public has the ability to respond through social media, no matter what type of media you are using to communicate. This kind of feedback connects crisis communication to negative news issues you encountered in the previous subunit. Remember that context of crisis communication introduces special requirements and limitations for a business communicator, which Robertory also discusses.

6.4: Press Conferences URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 17, Section 4: Press Conferences"

Read this section. A press conference is a controlled opportunity to communicate with the public through the media. A professional representative of the company who is fully prepared should be the spokesperson. These events require calm and the ability to anticipate questions and prepare responses in advance. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

File University of Kansas: "Preparing a Press Conference"

Read these slides about how to prepare for and conduct a press conference. This presentation includes information about meeting audience and media needs, setting up the room, and post-conference follow-up.

7.1: Intrapersonal Communication URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 16: Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Business Communication"

Read the introduction to this chapter, which discusses understanding ourselves, how we plan, and how we remember. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

7.2: Self-Concept and Dimensions of Self URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 16, Section 2: Self-Concept and Dimensions of Self"

Read this section, which focuses on two concepts: the monologue we have with ourselves that influences our external reactions and how the way we see ourselves can be described along four dimensions of awareness. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page Rusty Waller's "Self-Concept and Personal Growth"

These videos provide perspectives on intrapersonal concepts related to the self. The best way to appreciate these videos is through self-evaluation. As the professor defines and discusses the concepts, relate them to your own traits.

7.3: Interpersonal Needs & Social Penetration Theory URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 16, Section 3: Interpersonal Needs"

Read this section, which focuses on Maslow's hierarchy of needs and how it is used to frame many messages. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

URL Wikipedia: "Interpersonal Communication"

Read this article, which explains interpersonal communication. Consider the ways in which you can apply this knowledge in your own interactions.

URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 16, Section 4: Social Penetration Theory"

Read this section, which explores social penetration theory, self-disclosure, and interpersonal relationships. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

7.4: Rituals of Conversation and Interviews URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 16, Section 5: Rituals of Conversation and Interviews"

Read this section, which covers the typical steps involved in carrying out a conversation and how they can help you prepare for a job interview. You will also explore post-interview practices and activities. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

7.5: Conflict in the Workplace URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 16, Section 6: Conflict in the Work Environment"

Conflict is unavoidable, and can be an opportunity for clarification, growth, and even reinforcement of relationships. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

8.1: Intercultural Communication URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 18: Intercultural and International Business Communication"

The awareness of varying perspectives that stem from cultural differences is key to effective communication in global commerce. Read the introduction to this chapter and section 1. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 18, Section 2: How to Understand Intercultural Communication"

Ethnocentric tendencies, stereotyping, and assumptions of similarity can make it difficult to cope with cultural differences. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

8.2: Cultural Characteristics URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 18, Section 3: Common Cultural Characteristics"

All cultures have initiations, traditions, history, values and principles, purposes, symbols, and boundaries. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page University of Amsterdam: "The Cultural Approach"

These videos explain the cultural approach to communication, in which communication is viewed as the building block of culture and society. Review these examples of how communication and culture are intertwined and can produce distinct traits when cultures are compared.

Page "Common Cultural Characteristics"
By the end of this video you will be able to name several common cultural characteristics that are expressed very differently across the world. You should be able to give several examples of these characteristics in your life.
URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 18, Section 4: Divergent Cultural Characteristics"

Cultures have distinct orientations when it comes to rules, uncertainty, time, masculinity, directness, materialism, and power, and those traits influence their communication patterns. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page University of Amsterdam: "Cultural Groups"

These videos discuss the cultural influences and pressures that result in unified characterstics among the members of a cultural group.

8.3: The Global Marketplace URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 18, Section 5: International Communication and the Global Marketplace"

Read this section, which takes a systems approach to describe the nature of global marketing, including political and legal systems, economics, ethics, and the global village. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 18, Section 7: The International Assignment"

Read this section, which covers the challenges involved in taking on an international assignment, including the preparatory steps recommended to make acculturation more successful. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

8.4: Styles of Management URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 18, Section 6: Styles of Management"

To explain how people and their relationships are a reflection of their culture and cultural viewpoints, this section describes three theories of management - referred to as X, Y, and Z - which are examples of distinct views on worker motivation, the need for supervision, and the possibility of collaboration. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page Bob Norton's "Five Styles of Management"

Watch this video about the five styles of management: micromanagement, management by objectives, management by exception, leadership, and management by wandering around. No business practices these styles exclusively or in isolation, and numerous aspects of management need to be considered when choosing the appropriate style.

9.1: What Is a Group? URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 19: Group Communication, Teamwork, and Leadership"

Read the introduction to this chapter and section 1. These sections distinguish between groups and teams, catalogue types of groups based on their structure and function, and discuss the impact of group size on member participation. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

9.2: Group Life Cycles and Member Roles URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 19, Section 2: Group Life Cycles and Member Roles"

This section covers the predictable patterns that groups tend to follow from their creation to their dissolution. It also discusses how groups assign roles to members in order to function efficiently and the life cycles those roles also tend to experience. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

9.3: Group Problem Solving URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 19, Section 3: Group Problem Solving"

This section details seven steps that can characterize problem solving in groups. Note the table that introduces a cost-benefit analysis for a set of solutions to a hypothetical problem. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

9.4: Business and Professional Meetings URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 19, Section 4: Business and Professional Meetings"

Meetings require planning, choice of appropriate technology, and understanding of organizational communication. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Page Dianna Booher's "Get Your Point Across in Meetings"

These videos give seven tips for getting your point across in a meeting. Booher's advice focuses on participants, not those running the meeting. These tips can be applied to all meetings.

9.5: Teamwork and Leadership URL Business Communication for Success: "Chapter 19, Section 5: Teamwork and Leadership"

This section discusses the nature of teamwork, identifies different types of leadership styles, and explores the ways leaders develop effective teams and choose team members. After you read, try the exercises at the end of the section.

Study Guides Page Unit 1 Study Guide: Introduction to Business Communication
Page Unit 2 Study Guide: Delivering Your Message
Page Unit 3 Study Guide: Understanding Your Audience
Page Unit 4 Study Guide: Effective Business Writing
Page Unit 5 Study Guide: Developing and Delivering Effective Business Presentations
Page Unit 6 Study Guide: Negative News and Crisis Communication
Page Unit 7 Study Guide: Intrapersonal and Interpersonal Business Communication
Page Unit 8 Study Guide: Intercultural and International Business Communication
Page Unit 9 Study Guide: Group Communication, Teamwork, and Leadership
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